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The Real Joker: Warmonger Extraordinaire Alfred Harmsworth aka Lord Northcliffe

EDITOR’S NOTE: Portions of this article’s historical references were extracted from Spartacus Educational, an encyclopedic resource written by historian John Simkin

The persona of newspaper magnate Alfred Charles William Harmsworth (1865 – 1922) leaps from pages of British history like some sort of real-world manifestation of the villainous Joker. In 1918, Britain conferred on Harmsworth the title Viscount (Lord) Northcliffe for his service as the head of the British war mission in the United States.

Lord Northcliffe bares as much responsibility for starting and prolonging World War I as anyone of that era. Indeed, he is the fonte of 20th century of chaos operatives and the century-old iteration of the Crime Syndicate that runs the world today.

Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe

At the age of 23, Harmsworth, the editor and publisher of an obscure little weekly newspaper, married into British aristocracy by wedding Mary Elizabeth Milner, eldest daughter of Robert Milner, known as the Rothschild of the West Indies.

His mother claimed he would end up with no money and a brood of children with Mary. As you will see, Alfred proved to be a chip off the same block in the insights arena. The couple bore no children, but Harmsworth had four acknowledged children by two women with whom he had affairs, including a 16-year-old housemaid. As we see elsewhere in history, wealth and connections gained through marriage can launch a psychopath from mediocrity to the top of their field; in this case, publishing.

Harmsworth built what was then the largest periodical publishing empire in the world, Amalgamated Press. In 1896, he began publishing the Daily Mail in London, which was a hit, holding the world record for daily circulation until Harmsworth’s death. By 1914, he controlled 40 percent of the morning newspaper circulation in Britain, 45 percent of the evening and 15 percent of the Sunday circulation.

One of his journalists, Tom Clarke, pointed out that Lord Northcliffe dictated the political stance of his newspaper: “He (Northcliffe) was sometimes violent in both speech and action (once in his office he took a flying kick at the seat of the pants of a man who had annoyed him; and on another occasion put his foot through a man’s hat in his temper). He seldom sought advice, and treated it so roughly if he did not like it, that people hesitated to give it him. When he spoke, everybody else listened, usually without challenge. He suffered from little opposition.”

According to Harry J. Greenwall, the author of Northcliffe: Napoleon of Fleet Street (1957), Harmsworth “with the Daily Mail unleashed a tremendous force of potential mass thought-control” as it became the “trumpet… of British Imperialism.”

War is Good Business and Sells Newspapers

The Boer War proved to be very popular with the British public. In 1898, the Daily Mail was selling 400,000 copies a day. Harmsworth encouraged people to buy the newspaper for nationalistic reasons, making it clear to his readers that his newspaper stood “for the power, the supremacy and the greatness of the British Empire.” By 1899, it had reached 600,000. During the most dramatic moments of the war in 1900, it was almost a million and a half. However, after the war, circulation fell to 700,000.

Lord Northcliffe had consistently described Germany as Britain’s “secret and insidious enemy,” and he commissioned Robert Blatchford to visit Germany and write a series of articles setting out the dangers. The Germans Blatchford wrote, were making “gigantic preparations” to destroy the British Empire and “to force German dictatorship upon the whole of Europe.” He complained that Britain was not prepared and argued that the country was facing the possibility of an “Armageddon.” He used his newspapers to urge an increase in defense spending and a reduction in the amount of money being spent on social insurance schemes.

Harmsworth had developed a close relationship with fellow psychopath Winston Churchill. Churchill had trended toward butter instead of guns in national affairs. Then, influenced by Harmsworth, British Prime Minister Asquith appointed Churchill as head of the Admirality in 1911. The Admiralty position suddenly cured Churchill’s passion for “economy.” The “new ruler of the King’s navy” demanded a massive expenditure on new battleships.

In 1912 and in the midst of warmongering and pressure to build up the military, PM Asquith wrote to his confidante Venetia Stanley: “He (Northcliffe) is anxious that I should see him. I hate and distrust the fellow and all his works… so I merely said that if he chose to ask me directly to see him, and he had anything really new to communicate, I would not refuse. I know of few men in this world who are responsible for more mischief, and deserve a longer punishment in the next.”

Harmsworth’s editorship of the Daily Mail in the run-up to the first World War, when the paper displayed “a virulent anti-German sentiment,” led The Star to declare, “Next to the Kaiser, Lord Northcliffe has done more than any living man to bring about the war.”

Such was Harmsworth’s influence on anti-German propaganda during the first World War that a German warship was sent to shell his house, Elmwood, in Broadstairs, in an attempt to assassinate him.

Once the war had started, Harmsworth used his newspaper empire to promote anti-German hysteria. It was the Daily Mail that first used the term “Huns” to describe the Germans and “thus at a stroke was created the image of a terrifying, ape-like savage that threatened to rape and plunder all of Europe, and beyond.”

As Philip Knightley, the author of “The First Casualty: The War Correspondent as Hero, Propagandist and Myth Maker” (1982), has pointed out: “The war was made to appear one of defense against a menacing aggressor. The Kaiser was painted as a beast in human form… The Germans were portrayed as only slightly better than the hordes of Genghis Khan, rapers of nuns, mutilators of children, and destroyers of civilisation.” In one report, the newspaper referred to Kaiser Wilhelm II as a “lunatic,” a “barbarian,” a “madman,” a “monster,” a “modern judas,” a “criminal monarch” and that familiar term “mad dog.”

For more on the true Kaiser Wilhelm II, see the “Innocence of Wilhelm II” below.

Once the war began, there were still openings to resolve it and restore peace. But Harmsworth used his influence to make sure cooler heads where shuttled aside. His newspapers campaigned for brutal hardliner Lord Kitchener to become Secretary of State for War over the more moderate Richard Haldane.

After Kitchener was installed, Harmsworth revealed what a vapid joker he was. He argued that Britain could use its navy to blockade and then defeat Germany, thus ending the war by Christmas 1914. Kitchener then presented to the bumblers, incompetents and jokers the wake up call. A.J.P. Taylor recounts: “He (Lord Kitchener) startled his colleagues at the first cabinet meeting which he attended by announcing that the war would last three years, not three months, and that Great Britain would have to put an army of millions into the field.” Harmsworth and fellow joker Winston Churchill’s war planning turned out badly misplaced.

On August 8, 1914, the House of Commons passed the Defence of the Realm Act (DORA) without debate. The legislation gave the government executive powers to suppress published criticism. During the war, publishing information calculated to be indirectly or directly of use to the enemy became an offense and accordingly punishable in a court of law. Lord Kitchener and the War Minister were determined not to have any journalists reporting the war from the western front.

Here, Harmsworth showed his true Luciferian colors and objected. His motive was not free speech but rather the ability to freely report and profit from newspaper sales, which were booming.

Inventing Atrocity Propaganda: Practiced to this Day

So Harmsworth directed his newspapers to develop contrived stories about German “atrocities” in Belgium and France. The vast majority of these have been determined to be falsifications. But at the time, they served to whip up war hysteria.

Madness is Repeating the Same Mistakes Over and Over

More than 3 million men volunteered to serve in the British Armed Forces during the first two years of the war. But by late 1915, after suffering large casualties, the Army was hitting the wall on replacements. Harmsworth was an early advocate for conscription (compulsory enrollment) and finally, on January 21, 1916, conscription was installed. He personally received a large number of threatening letters because of his compulsion campaign.

All the same, the joker Harmsworth and his War Party got another wake up call. In the first six months of conscription, the average monthly enlistment was not much above 40,000 — less than half the rate under the voluntary system.

In December 1915, General Douglas Haig was appointed Commander in Chief of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). Harmsworth developed a close relationship with Haig and became convinced that he was the man to win the war. The joker’s message in his newspapers was that “the inept politicians were letting down the clever generals.”

By the spring of 1916, morale in Britain was at an all-time low. “Haig needed a breakthrough to boost the flagging spirits of a country.” A plan was hatched for a major offensive on the western front. The joker was let in on it and his job was to push propaganda for it.

One of his biographers, S. J. Taylor, points out: “Northcliffe… at last capitulated, the Daily Mail descending into the propagandizing prose that came to characterize the reporting of the first World War. It was a style long since adopted by his competitors; stirring phrases, empty words, palpable lies.”

As the Battle of the Somme began in early hours of July 1, 1916, Haig wrote: “I feel that every step in my plan has been taken with the Divine help.” Whose divine help is the real question.

On the first day of the battle, 13 British divisions went “over the top” in regular waves. The attack was a total failure. German machine guns mowed the British over in rows: 19,000 killed, 57,000 casualties sustained. It was the greatest loss in a single day ever suffered by a British army and the greatest suffered by any army in the first World War.

The joker lied about the defeat in the Daily Mail, running the headline “Enemy Outgunned.” It reported: “In the first battle, we have beaten the Germans by greater dash in the infantry and vastly superior weight in munitions.” In a later report, it claimed: “The very attitudes of the dead, fallen eagerly forwards, have the look of expectant hope. You would say they died with the light of victory in their eyes.” How poetic, Lucifer.

Wrong yet again Joker.

Haig had talked beforehand of breaking off the offensive, if it were not at once successful. Instead, as was the characteristic of the Luciferians, he doubled down. By the end of the Somme campaign, the British had suffered 420,000 casualties, the French lost nearly 200,000, and it is estimated that German casualties were in the region of 500,000. Despite mounting criticism over his disregard of British lives, Haig survived as commander-in-chief. One of the main reasons for this was the support he received from Harmsworth’s newspapers.

Following the fiasco at the Somme and the shedding there of more than 1.1 million of the flower of European manhood, Harmsworth developed a close friendship with David Lloyd George. Both men were concerned that the stalemate on the western front would encourage Asquith to seek a negotiated peace with Germany.

Harmsworth arranged for George to be interviewed by Roy Howard of the American United Press. Published on Sept. 29, 1916, the War Secretary declared that the Allies “intended to fight to the finish and would not agree to a compromise peace.”

The joker also needed scapegoats for the war’s disasters. It was felt that Asquith was turning into a slacker and was losing his stomach for more carnage. Thus, a press campaign was launched to successfully replace him with Lloyd George. In reality, George was the front for Lord Alfred Milner. Milner ran the Round Table, also called Milner’s Kindergarten, a group of mustachioed buggery homosexuals that housed a cartel of the most powerful and wealthy people on the planet. The New Nationalist covered this in “Cecil Rhodes and his Warmongering Buggery Hegemony.”

The Daily Chronicle attacked the role that Harmsworth and the other newspaper barons played. It argued that the new government “will have to deal with the Press menace as well as the submarine menace; otherwise Ministries will be subject to tyranny and torture by daily attacks impugning their patriotism and earnestness to win the war.”

In reality, British war capability was diminished considerably. So the joker’s talents were turned to dragging, cajoling and bribing America into the senseless war. America entered WWI on April 6, 1917. Harmsworth in June 1917 went to the U.S. as head of the British war mission. It was said he had excellent relations with Woodrow Wilson and the War Party hacks around him.

With the U.S. in the war (but Russia being knocked out), the British doves mounted a short recovery. At the end of November 1917, Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne, submitted a letter to The Times, another Harmsworth newspaper, calling for a negotiated peace. He refused to publish it, and it appeared in the Daily Telegraph instead.

In 1918, the joker became director of wartime propaganda. The title for all practical purposes was a formality.

Working Overtime and to the End to Ensure the Next Big War

Throughout 1918, Harmsworth, now dubbed Lord Northcliffe, continued to use his newspaper empire to call for Germany’s unconditional surrender. In one article, he suggested that unless Germany was crushed and large reparations extracted, Britain would have to deal with them sometime in the future. The joker even suggested that his newspapers might have to write about “The Great War of 1938.” As a truce loomed, Lord Northcliffe wrote to George demanding that he should be involved in the propaganda campaign that should take place before any peace agreement be signed with Germany. The joker, in effect, was working to humiliate Germany to such as extent that the seeds for WWII were planted.

After the Armistice, Geoffrey Dawson, the puppet editor of The Times, attended the Versailles Peace Conference. But Dawson resigned in February 1919, saying he found Lord Northcliffe’s “irresponsible Hun-baiting” intolerable. The joker was instrumental in behind-the-scenes lobbying to poison the Versailles Treaty and produce the worst possible product.

On April 6, 1919, his wartime ally George made an excoriating attack on Lord Northcliffe, calling his arrogance “diseased vanity.”

Lord Northcliffe’s health deteriorated rapidly in 1921. Some reports claim his was suffering from streptococcus, an infection of the bloodstream that damages the valves of the heart and causes kidney malfunction. Other reports claim he died of neurosyphilis. Either way, Lord Joker Northcliffe died none too soon in August 1922 at age 57. One of his last pronouncement was that “God is a homosexual.”

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  • Mudhole

    During the war, Harmsworth worked hand in glove with general John Charteris, Douglas Haig’s intelligence chief and Harmsworth’s evil twin.
    Known to his fellow officers as “Haig’s evil counsellor” Charteris was the source of much of the worst atrocity propaganda, including the ‘corpse factory’ lie where Germans were falsely accused of making soap from human bodies. This lie proved so useful that it was used again in WW2.

    Why are German casualties always ‘estimated’ in British accounts of WW1? Because Charteris simply made them up from thin air. The Germans always published their casualty numbers in the newspaper, and German newspapers were easily purchased in neutral Holland, so it was easy to find out exactly what the German casualty figures were. The actual figures were not high enough for Charteris, so he simply raised them by 50 or 100%. These ‘estimated’ figures are still used by British historians to this day, even though they know them to be false.
    I don’t know if Charteris was gay, but Haig certainly was, as were most of his staff, and his equally evil mentors Kitchener and Lord Esher as well.

    • Adrian Chetwynd

      @disqus_OmML4M68vI:disqus

      Where and when, did you learn what you have quoted here?

  • Adrian Chetwynd

    Here is a very different version of the events:http://nationalvanguard.org/2010/10/jewish-terror-the-story-of-lord-northcliffe/
    But even that version is quite alot different to the version I was led to believe was genuine a version a couple of years ago….

    So is (((Google))) reshaping history, yet again?

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