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The Louvre Returns Art Stolen by the ‘Nazis,’ But Does Not Return Art Stolen by the French State

Hitler and Göring looking at ‘Grosse Winterlandschaft’ at the exhibition ‘Werner Peiner und Paraskewe Bereskine’, Academy of Art in Berlin, Marc 4 ,1938 (‘Ausstellung in der Preussische Akademie der Künste in Berlin’). PHOTO: GermanArtGallery.edu/Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

By German Art Gallery | 7 February 2018

RENEGADE TRIBUNE — Recently the Louvre is showing Nazi-looted art in a bid to find its owners. The idea is to encourage the descendants of the works’ original owners to come forward and reclaim what is rightfully theirs.

However, the Louvre also owns art which was stolen by the French state from Germany at the end of World War II.

Would it not make sense that the Louvre also returns this looted art to Germany?

German Art Gallery has asked mr. Sebastien Allard, Chief Curator of the Louvre, to return two gobelins by Werner Peiner – each containing 3,5 kilogram gold threads – to the Federal Republic of Germany.

The huge gobelins named ‘Char de Chevaux‘ (‘Der Geist‘) and ‘Char de Taureax‘ (‘Die Fruchtbarkeit‘) were stolen by the French Republic in 1945. Notwithstanding protests by the British Administration in 1945 against this illegal action, France transported these art works -which are part of the ‘Von Ribbentrop collection’- to Paris.

German Art Gallery reported to the German Federal Office for Central Services and Unresolved Property Issues (BADV) about the location of the stolen gobelins, which were until recently thought to be lost. The BADV has confirmed to us that they have informed the German Federal Minister of Finance.

The Centre Pompidou earlier published on internet documents in which the illegal confiscation of these gobelins were described in detail. Meanwhile they have removed them. German Art Gallery is in the possession of hard copies of these documents, please see below some relevant quotes.

We are waiting for an answer of the Chief Curator of the Louvre. […]

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